Personal Statement

For the past 20 years, I have had a keen interest in advancing applied research in library and information practice. This process has included using the most appropriate and rigorous research methodologies to answer the questions my discipline has identified as most important. We refer to this approach to using the best available research results for decision-making as Evidence-Based Librarianship & Information Practice. An outgrowth of my interest has been the adaptation of evidence-based practice research designs such as the cohort study, Delphi Method, or the randomized controlled trial to answer important questions in library and information practice. Experimental designs such as the randomized controlled trial have not been used much within my field so I have given them a high priority in my research projects. Since 2002, I have been the principal investigator on seven experimental design studies. For all seven of these studies, I have mentored junior faculty members, other professionals, or medical students. Two of these studies have won an award and another an honorable mention in the annual Medical Library Association Research Award competition. A third study earned a research award from the South Central Chapter of the Medical Library Association.

Areas of Specialty

Evidence Based Practice
Biomedical Informatics
Research Study Design
Education

Education

I have taught in a variety of contexts throughout my career, although I have always emphasized an experiential learning approach based primarily on the theories of Dewey, Kolb, Krathwohl, and Bloom. I began my career in library instruction, building on the foundation established with my three mentors during my internship at the University of Michigan. Eventually my career path took me into collection development in 1985, but I continued to teach regularly using active learning approaches. During the years 1997-2001, I was an active tutor for several instructional “blocks” in the UNM School of Medicine, as summarized elsewhere in this document. In 2001, I was promoted to a newly created position as Coordinator of Academic and Clinical Services and then transitioned to the Learning Design Center in 2005. These roles allowed me to engage in instructional design and to teach even more than in the past. During 2002, for example, I taught 314 total contact hours. I continue to teach, but also have become a mentor and coach for other faculty members. I served as the course co-director for the Evidence-Based Practice required of all medical students from 2008 to 2017. This role transitioned to a new Quantitative Medicine course co-directorship. I also co-teach a research methods course for all physician assistant students, a biomedical informatics course for all MSCR students, and a public health course required of all public health graduate students.

Certifications

Distinguished Member. Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP)

Achievements & Awards

Exemplary Teacher at UNM. Learning Environment Office. School of Medicine. University of New Mexico. Albuquerque, NM. July 17, 2020.

Key Publications


Journal Article
Eldredge, Jonathan, 2012 The evolution of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, part 1: defining EBLIP Evidence Based Library and Information Practice , vol. 7, Issue 4, 139-45

Courses Taught

During 2020 I was an Instructor of Record for the following courses:

Quantitative Medicine Block. School of Medicine. Co-Chair for this block that covers epidemiology, biostatistics, and Evidence Based Practice (EBP) skills required of all second-year medical students.

Foundations of Research Methodologies. Co-Instructor. Required course for all Physician Assistant Program first-year students. This course covers study design, biostatistics, library and informatics competencies, epidemiology, and Evidence Based Practice (EBP).

Biomedical Informatics One. Master of Science in Clinical Research program course required of all first-year graduate students.

Biomedical Informatics Two. Master of Science in Clinical Research program elective course for second- or third-year graduate students.

Determinants & Equity in Public Health course. College of Population Health. MPH Program. Co-instructor for this required course.

Research and Scholarship

For the past 20 years, I have had a keen interest in advancing applied research in library and information practice. This process has included using the most appropriate and rigorous research methodologies to answer the questions my discipline has identified as most important. We refer to this approach to using the best available research results for decision-making as Evidence-Based Librarianship & Information Practice. An outgrowth of my interest has been the adaptation of evidence-based practice research designs such as the cohort study, Delphi Method, or the randomized controlled trial to answer important questions in library and information practice. Experimental designs such as the randomized controlled trial have not been used much within my field so I have given them a high priority in my research projects. Since 2002, I have been the principal investigator on seven experimental design studies. For all seven of these studies, I have mentored junior faculty members, other professionals, or medical students. Two of these studies have won an award and another an honorable mention in the annual Medical Library Association Research Award competition. A third study earned a research award from the South Central Chapter of the Medical Library Association.